No, this blog is not dead.

It has just been neglected by its horrible owner, me. There is a simple but disheartening reason for this: the past month has been, for the most part, rather lacking in language study. I’d come up with some wonderful excuse, like a death in the family, or perhaps my contraction of some strange and uncomfortable disease, but I have no such excuse. The nasty truth is, I just got out of the habit. I’ve not listened to many podcasts, in German or Russian; I’ve barely even looked at any foreign language websites; and, I must admit, I haven’t even opened my book on Russian… at all. Other things just kind of crept into my life and knocked language learning out of the way. I’m not happy about it in the least.

I’ve decided to remedy this problem, and get my butt back on track, both with German and Russian. I suppose this post is part of my “getting back on track.” This blog was created to be part learning resource, part language learning journal for myself, and I guess it’s only fair that I note when I’m studying, and also when I’m not studying.

I think that part of the reason I fell off the wagon is that I’ve been pretty slack about a time for my studying. I’ve never really said, “Alright, I’m going to study German for one hour at 6PM everyday”, or any such thing. My study times have always been haphazard to say the least. Of course, having a toddler makes it difficult to say such things and truly be able to stick to them, but I’d be lying to myself if I said I couldn’t work out some kind of schedule. My university courses start up again in about a month, which will alter things a bit more, but I think I’m going to try and sit down for at least half an hour everyday at say, 7PM, to do some studying. If I can get more tidbits of time in throughout the day, great, but a regular half an hour is better than no studying at all.

3 thoughts on “No, this blog is not dead.”

  1. One of the things I like about language learning blogs is the absence of omniscience on the writer’s part. At language learning sites, you might wonder what’s wrong with you that the site’s authors know so much and you still know so little! (I even feel this way when I look at my own site – multilingua.info – and see what I’ve been able to compile versus what I can actually remember!) The fun of the blogs is knowing that others, like you, struggle, but that through the ups and downs, they keep going. And like you, sometimes they stall. Which is also okay, as long as you get back to it.

    One problem that I think language bloggers run into, though, is the fear they need to have something useful to say every time they post. Which is funny, because no other variety of blog is very consistent in having useful things to say 🙂 And frankly, the personal notes about the more mundane aspects of language learning and dealing with its frustrations often provide more benefit, for the comfort they offer, than somebody’s neat new trick that’s a little too much like something from the omniscient language learning site.

    I’m not sure whether anyone else actually gets anything out of my blog. But I know the gnawing sense that I should post again goads me to at least pick up a book or google for a new idea about a language I’m learning. So I’ll have something to post about. I think doing it this way, having a blog helps. The other way, it might just be one more aspect of language learning that’s frustrating you, at times.

    It’s good to see a new post. Remember, though, that it’s just a blog. So don’t worry so much about having something new to report. Some people may show up here in search of the secret that will solve their problems learning Russian. But regulars are often just interested in finding out how a fellow language learner is doing these days and if there’s something fun to try to get out of the doldrums (which you know they’re in, because they’re reading blogs instead of studying!).

    Good luck with the regular studying. And if you can find a way to actually clear a half-hour a day at a regular time, keep us posted, since it’s probably a much bigger challenge for the typical language learner than even conjugations and declensions.

  2. Geoff: Thanks for such a great comment. There is certainly not any omniscience around me; I’m just another average Joe who likes foreign languages. 🙂

    You’re right about me feeling as if I need to have something truly meaningful to warrant a new entry here. I think that’s one of the main reasons the number of posts here is still so low. I at first thought that mundane, everyday “this is the problem I had with German” posts would bore people to death. Perhaps I was wrong!

    Thanks for the luck. I’m bound to need it!

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